Kaufman Teakwood Sandstone

Stone Stories: Let me show you the stone way. Leave a comment

Architect Ed Calma has a certain quality that makes his work identifiable. I do not mean that he is repetitive. His lines and forms come together in a way that has his signature, just like with masters like Manansala, whose paint strokes capture the unique essence of the artist. There is a certain quality in a Calma that is unmistakable.

This Kaufman Teakwood sandstone wall used on this mid 2000 villa in Pasig does not look like any other work Calma has created. His other works are normally white, gray or brown. Wood elements would be the extent of color used in the majority of his works.

Wood is actually a material Calma loves. He has used it in his own home, and in homes in Forbes, Dasma and many other high-end villages around the Philippines. But just like all other architects, after experiencing first hand the difficulty of maintaining wood, and the typical customer’s personality who loathe paying for its maintenance, he began exploring other materials that could give that visual warmth he is looking for use on his exteriors. Kaufman teakwood sandstone is one of those solutions.

Sandstone, which is normally the realm of Asian style architecture is reinterpreted by Calma as a modernistic feature wall which shows the materials’ flexibility. This material will surely develop a patina, which is part of the aging process a home will go through. The signs of wear on the material is like a story book of the family that lived in it. It becomes intertwined with the your life story.

When you see million dollar homes with mismatched porcelain tile cladding, and white water mark drips, the feeling is different. The house seems to have no life, and seems cold when those fake wood or stone tiles just never seem to age. It is like plastic. Natural material is imperfect. It has variation, and that is what makes it beautiful.

I realize my essays may hurt some readers, but I am just being honest in expressing my opinion that stone gives life to a project that no tile can. It might cost more, but think of it as an investment. I am offered tiles non-stop on a daily basis by suppliers from Italy, Spain and China. I choose not to consider them, no matter how much money I make or do not make as a result of this decision. I know you love stone, and all things natural. Let me show you the stone way.

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